Section 3
SCREEN RESOLUTION
Before you begin designing a screen, you must decide of the screen resolution you wan to use. Check the manual that came with your system to determine the specific capability of your system. The term resolution describes the number of pixels that are displayed on a screen. For instance a resolution of 640 x 480 means that there are 640 across and 480 pixels down for a total of 307,200 points of color.

It should be noted that as you increase resolution, you not only increase the number of pixels that appear on a screen, but you also increase the amount of pixel data that must be eventually stored on a floppy, hard disk, CD-ROM or transmitted over an inter/intranet. A good rule of thumb that you should follow is to select the lowest screen resolution that will give you the screen quality that you desire. For this reason, you should strongly consider a screen resolution of 640 x 480, 256 colors for your project, even though your equipment may be able to handle higher resolutions. Once you have selected a screen resolution, you should try to maintain it through a lesson to provide a consistent look to your lesson. Below is a summary of popular screen resolutions.

POPULAR GRAPHIC FILE TYPES
There are literally dozens of graphic file types from which to choose. Some of the more popular file types are listed below.

GIF - Widely used on the Internet for drawings, graphs and many pictures
JPEG - Widely used on the Internet for high quality pictures
BMP - Windows Bitmap
TIF - Tagged Image File
MSP - Microsoft Paint
PNG  - Portable Network Graphics
WMF - Window’s Metafile

To learn more, search the Internet using the keywords Graphic File Types.

USING TEXT EFFECTIVELY

Crowded Text
The key to designing effective screens is to keep them simple. As with slides and overheads, avoid the urge to cram a screen with as much text as you can.  Screens filled with text are difficult to read, induce learner fatigue, and ultimately reduce learning.

A much better approach is to use several screens in an outline form as shown above.

Upper and Lower Case Letters
Research has shown that words which use upper and lowercase letters are easier to read than words that use all CAPITALS. Avoid long passages of capitalized words. Reserve capitalized words for emphasis.

Justification
There are three basic ways to justify type using HTML code. The most popular ways are left, right and center justification.
 
 
Left
Right
Centered
Research has shown that words which use upper and lowercase letters are easier to read than words that use all CAPITALS. Avoid long passages of capitalized words. Reserve capitalized words for emphasis. 
Research has shown that words which use upper and lowercase letters are easier to read than words that use all CAPITALS. Avoid long passages of capitalized words. Reserve capitalized words for emphasis.
Research has shown that words which use upper and lowercase letters are easier to read than words that use all CAPITALS. Avoid long passages of capitalized words. Reserve capitalized words for emphasis. 

TIP: If you want to use display type that uses different type styles and colors, consider creating it as a graphic and then insert it into your web page.

Wrapping Text
An attractive way to combine graphic material and text is to “wrap” you text around and beside the graphic being presented.

Type Styles
There are three basic styles of type.

Type Variations
Most type can be bolded, italicized, colored, and highlighted depending upon the word processing or authoring program.

NOTE: The key to developing attractive type is to keep it simple and consistent throughout you lesson.

Because there are literally thousands of different type styles, you may want to search the Internet using the keywords, Type Design.

BORDER, BACKGROUND AND TYPE COLOR
One of the first decisions you must make is to establish a “color theme” for your lesson. A color them is established when you select the colors to be used for the border, background, and type for each screen in your lesson. Below are listed some guidelines that should help you select your color theme.







NOTE: Whenever possible, add shadowing and highlights to borders, bars, and color islands to give the visual elements in your lessons a professional 3D look.

GRAPHICS
There is a wide range of graphic materials that you can include in your MTS lessons.

Line Drawings
The most common type of graphic used in MTS lessons is the line drawing. A line drawing may be created in several ways.

3D Models and Graphics
3D models and graphics add depth to text and graphics.

Photographs
Black & white, color photographs can be added to your lesson using a scanner. Most photographs can be saved using only 256 color.







TIP: To help you stay organized, on the back of each graphic place a self adhesive label to record the program title and screen number to help you reference where each piece of graphic material will be used. Never write on the back of a photograph with anything. Ink can seep through the paper and the pressure of writing can create depressions.

Example:

Popular Tools
Below are some popular tools currently being used to create and manipulate graphic materials.

Adobe Photoshop
Open Source Graphic Programs



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